learning

3 Blog Posts, and Some Tribal Leadership

This week in "Theresa's Journey Inward" we see three different perspectives from her three thought leaders in Zen Habits, Culture Sync, and Neil Crofts "Holos". 

Zen Habits, "A Guide to Getting Good at Dealing With Chaos" 

In classic Zen style, Leo Baubista sets up another way of applying his wisdom in creating habits surrounding being okay with chaos. In the same vein of understanding that the source of all our problems comes from our own "mind movie", that is, the "ideal life" that we have set out to ascribe to the world, the source of our problem with chaos comes from our own aspirations for things to remain in and fit inside the box. He ascertains that, given some time and practice, we can fix this disjoint between the ideal situation and the situation at hand to give us more immediate joy in the present moment. 

Culture Sync, "A New Hope" 

From the firm that gave us "Tribal Leadership", Culture Sync unpacks moments where revamping internal culture can break open silos. Through an example of breaking down a traditional hierarchical organization, Culture Sync highlights company reaction to the restructuring as "hopeful", and makes some pointed references to Star Wars: Rogue One. Through rebellion at the ground level, Culture Sync strives to point the current social sphere towards a new era where teams are trusted to run organizations through Tribal Leadership. It concludes with a call to action for newbies to take-no-prisoners when creating open discourse in incumbent company culture. 

Holos, "The Opposite of Safety and the Source of Success"

Neil Crofts in this post regarding obedience claims that its opposite isn't anarchy, it is thinking and empowerment. By addressing fear as the main motivator behind unsuccessful business thinking in the age of contemporary thinking, Crofts demerits the ideology that organizations are only for the gain of monetary value and capitalist idealism. Through breaking down what organizations are for, through the codification of cause and code in specialist applications such as education and crisis, we start seeing that the current mode of thinking does not allow for organizations to be more than simply tools for gain. He ends by asking the question again, what are organizations for?

Tribal Leadership: Reading Summary

"Tribal Leadership" explains five tribal stages in their leadership dogma, helping creative leaders identify which actions affect their organizations, and advising on which strategies will enable the tribe to upgrade to the next level. The authors discuss how each stage has a unique set of leverage points and why it is critical to understand them. The five stages include:

  1.  These are tribes whose members are despairingly hostile—they may create scandals, steal from the company, or even threaten violence.
  2. The dominant culture for 25% of workplace tribes, this stage includes members who are passively antagonistic, sarcastic, and resistant to new management initiatives.
  3. 49% of workplace tribes are in this stage. It is marked by knowledge hoarders who want to outwork and outthink their competitors on an individual basis. They are lone warriors who not only want to win, but need to be the best and brightest.
  4. The transition from “I’m great” to “we’re great” comes in this stage where the tribe members are excited to work together for the benefit of the entire company.
  5. Less than 2% of workplace tribal culture is in this stage when members who have made substantial innovations seek to use their potential to make a global impact.

"Tribal Leadership" claims that leaders, managers, and organizations fail to understand, motivate, and grow their tribes, finding it impossible to succeed in an increasingly fragmented world of business. The often counterintuitive findings of Tribal Leadership are designed to help leaders at today’s major corporations, small businesses, and nonprofits learn how to take the people in their organization from adequate to outstanding, to discover the secrets that have led the highest-level tribes to remarkable heights, and to find new ways to succeed where others have failed.

My personal learning from this book stem primarily from a nice, packaged framework from which to understand company culture. Because I already operate in a fragmented, 1099 work environment, I have more than once only ever interacted with Stage 1 or Stage 2 in my contracting work as a freelance theatre and fine artist. I have been truly lucky in some capacity to have a company culture at the moment that allows me to be vulnerable and part of a key team of people aimed at serving the students in an education role. I know that ultimately I will be a lifelong learner, and will have a long and fruitful career as an educator, but at some point I wish to return to the corporate world and see what that has to offer. When I do, I will take the toolkit I have from this book and create some noise where I see fit. 

Exiting the Silo

Week 5

This week in Creative Leadership, we understand what it means to be linked to community.  

Talented colleagues in my course have had insightful perspectives regarding their connection to the world, and so far it has been a privilege to understand how interconnected we are to a variety of different modes of thinking.  

Mark Chamberlain’s Week 4 post regarding Scott Belsky’s “Making Ideas Happen” provided some valuable insight into the inner workings of in-house design teams. Mark’s insights around the power of an introspective approach when confronted with the myriad responsibilities one has within an organization revealed the importance of knowing yourself before being able to push change from within. While Belsky affirms multiple times in his novel that creatives posses the qualifications to lead, and to organize, teams of people, I appreciate Mark’s honesty in expressing discomfort in this role, in part from whole-heartedly relating to experiences in my own practice. Managing teams of designers, I have found, is the most uncomfortable hat I have had to wear. And yet, of all the validation-seeking and self-marketing tactics I have striven to adopt, this “leadership potential” feels like the least obnoxious hat to wear.

Olivia Pederson, in her expose on three blogs, unpacks transparency within organizations. While I am familiar with understanding social media within context of … well, social situations, I had not fully grasped the capability for it to work as a feedback loop within communications systems in an organization. Her notes on the power of the consumer to influence a company’s stance and production power gives me hope, and affirms that local organizations in town that are tackling the achievement gap are on the right track.  

In fact, in related trends, I’m inspired by social justice organizations that are fighting the good fight. For those who are interested in learning more of this social transparency and diversity, Reve Academy and TheBrandLab are two organizations that are doing amazing work in Minneapolis.

In applying what I’ve learned from Belsky to these two perspectives, I find that my personal reality lies in a multitude of factors, stemming from a disjoint from what I have within, and how to relate to without. What I have appreciated about Zen Habits, both the blog and the book, is this perpetual emphasis of the internal workings of your process. By thoroughly watching what the inner life is doing to sabotage the ability to learn from external sources, and by continually shying away from weakness, the creative professional gets nowhere, fast.

I’m reminded in this moment about a yoga practice called ‘jnana yoga’, or “The Yoga of Wisdom”, which addresses the path of the mind used to inquire into its own nature and to transcend the mind’s identification with its thoughts and ego. And while this may be a turn off for the more logical-minded folks, what has been most helpful in this practice is the fairly straightforward comparison between stretching and fear. I find that my mind has a tendency to get lost in the confusion fear brings. If I use fear as just an indicator, things like growth tend to be less scary. It is your mind’s job to create fear to let you know you might get hurt. The same thing is true for stretching. In my creative pursuits, fear then becomes a form of stretching. Into these things – leadership, organization, self-discovery – I, therefore, lean.